Comments: 0

Read more about Why the “Usurp Authority” Argument Doesn’t Work (1 Timothy 2:12)

I recently had a conversation with an egalitarian that I thought would serve for a good jumping off point for a quick post about hermeneutics and exegesis. Over the course of the conversation, the standard proof texts for and against complementarianism were tossed out. As it usually does, we ended... Read More about Why the “Usurp Authority” Argument Doesn’t Work (1 Timothy 2:12)

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Read more about An Open Letter to the Board of Westminster Theological Seminary

Dear Board of Westminster Theological Seminary, I recently heard that WTS has suspended the adjunct appointment of Dr. Jeffery Waddington for signing the charges which were filed against Dr. Scott Oliphint. Having watched the address by Dr. Lillback, I was encouraged that the seminary had agreed to take steps not... Read More about An Open Letter to the Board of Westminster Theological Seminary

Comments: 0

Read more about A Consequence of Denying Simplicity

One of the hot topics among Reformed theologians over the past couple years has been the subject of Divine Simplicity. Simplicity, in its…well…simplest form posits that God is not composed of parts. That is to say, God’s love is not somehow distinct from His justice, mercy, aseity, omniscience, and so... Read More about A Consequence of Denying Simplicity

Comments: 0

Read more about Inspiration, Authorial Intent, and Death of the Author

When approaching systematic theology, the inevitable first topic is hermeneutics. One’s hermeneutical approach lays the groundwork for how every other topic is addressed. It provides the methodology for reading the text of scripture and the means for drawing conclusions about any of the topics that follow it. Now, when one... Read More about Inspiration, Authorial Intent, and Death of the Author

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Read more about The Holy Spirit in the Order and Purpose of Worship

I play drums. For many of my teen years, this meant playing with a variety of youth groups, filling in at friends’ churches, playing at youth camps, and so on. This exposed me to a whole host of different leadership styles and approaches to service planning. Even at that point,... Read More about The Holy Spirit in the Order and Purpose of Worship

Comment: 1

Read more about Lordship Salvation Is Not The Gospel

It is entirely by the intervention of Christ’s righteousness that we obtain justification before God. This is equivalent to saying that man is not just in himself, but that the righteousness of Christ is communicated to him by imputation, while he is strictly deserving of punishment. – John Calvin At... Read More about Lordship Salvation Is Not The Gospel

Comments: 2

Read more about And all these things…

A quick glance through any number of the recently published works of major Christian organizations, Christian media outlets and blogs, Facebook and Twitter debates between Christians, and you will find that seemingly everyone is on fire for social justice, whether advocating for this position or against that one. I certainly... Read More about And all these things…

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Read more about Baptism now saves you… or “What’s the deal with 1 Peter 3:21?”

Common in Reformed circles, in my experience, is a strange phenomenon. If you ask a group of Reformed believers: “Does baptism save a person?” The answer will almost always be a resounding, and at times unnecessarily aggressive “No!” If placed in the form of a true/false question we see something like... Read More about Baptism now saves you… or “What’s the deal with 1 Peter 3:21?”

Comments: 0

Read more about Gregory Hates Facebook Debates

Back in September, the inaugural Paideia Center reading groups began. For those who are unfamiliar, this is a project championed primarily by Reformed Theological Seminary and involves groups around the country reading classic works on a given topic and having monthly discussion groups as well as an annual conference. This... Read More about Gregory Hates Facebook Debates

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Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (5)

In the past series of posts, I’ve gone into detail concerning my primary reason for rejecting Theistic Evolution (TE), namely that TE fundamentally denies the core historicity of the Genesis creation accounts. While TE may be subjected to a variety of philosophical and theological critiques, the one that really caused... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (5)

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Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (4)

As I’ve highlighted previously, the Genesis creation accounts are rich and complex, providing us with a wealth of theological insight. However, it also seems apparent that they are making real, concrete claims about history. And those claims include material claims. But what, exactly, are these material claims? I’m going to... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (4)

Comments: 2

Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (3)

In the previous post, I argued that Walton’s “functional only” proposal concerning the Genesis creation accounts was not a viable option. What did this mean for me? It meant that I could no longer wave away the Genesis creation accounts as being merely interested in the way the world functions.... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (3)

Comment: 1

Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (2)

The most obvious challenge to Theistic Evolution (TE), from a Christian perspective, is that evolutionary theory seems to glaringly conflict with the unique, successive special creation events depicted in Genesis 1–2. Any TE who views scripture as in any sense authoritative must deal with this issue. How did I handle... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (2)

Comments: 0

Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (1)

Over the past several years, I have been a vocal proponent of the theological perspective on creation known as “Theistic Evolution.” For those who are unfamiliar with the idea, Theistic Evolution (hereafter, TE) is simply the theological position that God used (and indeed, is still using) the process of evolution... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (1)

Comments: 3

Read more about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (Introduction)

I am very pleased to bring to you a series of posts by a good friend of mine named Chris Lilley. I met Chris while we were students at Bethel University in Arden Hills, Minnesota. Both of us were students in the Biblical and Theological Studies program, and Chris was... Read More about Why I’m no longer a Theistic Evolutionist (Introduction)

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Read more about Keeping the Trinity One — Some Thoughts on Peter Leithart’s “Keeping the Trinity Personal”

I woke up Friday morning to a somewhat desperate message on Facebook asking “Have you read Leithart’s article?” With an accompanying link. I glimpsed at the article and added it to my OneNote folder to read later. I did my morning Bible reading and got ready for work. Throughout the... Read More about Keeping the Trinity One — Some Thoughts on Peter Leithart’s “Keeping the Trinity Personal”

Comments: 2

Read more about Jephthah’s Not-As-Rash-As-You-Thought Vow

As I have commented in the past, simply reading the Bible slowly, carefully, and with the intent to retain meaning, has tremendous benefits. Often times a text that seemed like a difficult text, or was confusing, becomes clear by simply reading the whole chapter or book in which it exists.... Read More about Jephthah’s Not-As-Rash-As-You-Thought Vow

Comments: 0

Read more about Pelagianism, Semi-Pelagianism, and Arminianism… Oh My!

There are a few terms that get thrown around (wrongly) in Reformed conversations, and as a result, we often bear false witness against our brothers unintentionally (or intentionally!). As Reformed Christians (or any Christians really), we ought to be concerned for God’s Law, and the 9th commandment exhorts us to speak... Read More about Pelagianism, Semi-Pelagianism, and Arminianism… Oh My!

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Read more about William Lane Craig – Theopaschitism (6)

As we have seen previously, William Lane Craig holds to a view which he calls Neo-Apollinarianism. Although he claims that this is only a proposal, and thus claims a sort of theological immunity regarding its heretical implications, I don’t believe we should let him off the hook quite so easily. To briefly... Read More about William Lane Craig – Theopaschitism (6)

Comment: 1

Read more about Divine Simplicity: A Shibboleth for Our Age

There are some sounds in any language that some non-native speakers struggle with. In fact, more often than not… they never quite get it. Often times, the language-learner simply substitutes a similar sound. A classic, albeit stereotypical, example of this phenomena is found in the many caricatures of native speakers... Read More about Divine Simplicity: A Shibboleth for Our Age

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Read more about Tragedy in the Cosmos: A Plurality of Will within The Godhead.

Reflecting on the idea of Eternal Functional Subordination (EFS) the thought struck me: What if there was a plurality of will within the Godhead? What if the Son did willingly submit to the Father from all eternity, as has been asserted by those who argue for EFS? I argue that... Read More about Tragedy in the Cosmos: A Plurality of Will within The Godhead.

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Read more about 2 Chronicles 30, The Regulative Principle of Worship, and the Intercession of Christ

I was reading 2 Chronicles 30 the other day, and something jumped out at me that was a real eye-opener. Hezekiah, as many of the kings of Judah were, was a Reformer of sorts. At the beginning of the divided kingdom, one of the typological features which pointed to the... Read More about 2 Chronicles 30, The Regulative Principle of Worship, and the Intercession of Christ

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Read more about Review of “Retrieving Eternal Generation” edited by Fred Sanders and Scott Swain (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

The doctrine of eternal generation is absolutely vital to the Christian doctrine of the Trinity. Without it, we are left not with the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit… but with three nameless, faceless, and relationless divine persons. However, in recent years this doctrine has come under attack. On... Read More about Review of “Retrieving Eternal Generation” edited by Fred Sanders and Scott Swain (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

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Read more about Review of “Learning to Love the Psalms” by W Robert Godfrey (Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2017)

The Psalms are commonly known as the Hymnbook of the Bible. Beyond a notebook of praise, it also contains some of the most well known and well-loved prayers in Scripture. However, in modern times many evangelicals —even those who would be counted among the so-called New Calvinists— are simply unfamiliar... Read More about Review of “Learning to Love the Psalms” by W Robert Godfrey (Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2017)

Comments: 0

Read more about Calvin and Henry on Hebrews… contra Eternal Functional Subordination

This year, I have decided to do a deep dive read of the book of Hebrews. It is such a fountain of Christology, Soteriology, and Covenant Theology that it is in many ways the central cog upon which Reformed theology turns. As part of that deep dive, I am not... Read More about Calvin and Henry on Hebrews… contra Eternal Functional Subordination

Comments: 0

Read more about The Only Reason Not to Play the Lottery: A Rejoinder to John Piper and Brandon Takacs

Recently on the Two Thieves Podcast, cohost Brandon Takacs (flying solo… not easy to do. Well done Brandon) approached a 2016 article by John Piper. The article is self-explanatorily titled Seven Reasons Not to Play the Lottery. I think that Takacs did a great job questioning some of the assumptions... Read More about The Only Reason Not to Play the Lottery: A Rejoinder to John Piper and Brandon Takacs

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Read more about Post Tenebras Lux: In Honor of RC Sproul

ἔσχατος ἐχθρὸς καταργεῖται ὁ θάνατος The last enemy to be destroyed is death. – 1 Corinthians 15:26 As I’m sure you have heard by now, the esteemed Reformed teacher, pastor, and theologian, RC Sproul, died this past Thursday (December 14, 2017). There are many moving tributes and comments flooding the... Read More about Post Tenebras Lux: In Honor of RC Sproul

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Read more about Socinianism, Divine Simplicity, and the Eternal Functional Subordination Controversy

Broadly speaking, the Reformation can be categorized under two headings. The first and the one that most of us are familiar with is the Magisterial Reformation.  The Magisterial Reformation saw itself in continuity with Catholic Christianity and only sought to reform the doctrinal deviations which crept into the Roman Catholic... Read More about Socinianism, Divine Simplicity, and the Eternal Functional Subordination Controversy

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Read more about A Review of “Calvinist” by Les Lanphere

Ladies and Gentlemen welcome to the Reformed Movie Cast. I’m your host Tony, and this isn’t a podcast… If you don’t get that joke, head over to ReformedPubcast.com, subscribe to the feed, and enjoy the history of a Reformed movement as it unfolds one RSS entry at a time. Les... Read More about A Review of “Calvinist” by Les Lanphere

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Read more about God the Son was Born of the Theotokos

Protestants often instinctively bristle up when hearing the claim that the title of Theotokos (God-bearer, Mother of God) is applied to Mary. Although this is understandable given the abuses of the Roman Catholic and, to a lesser degree, Eastern Orthodox Churches, it is vital that we understand the stakes of... Read More about God the Son was Born of the Theotokos

Comment: 1

Read more about The Westminster Statement (or Why the Nashville Statement is Unnecessary)

What is the Nashville Statement Yesterday (August 29, 2017) the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood issued a document called the Nashville Statement. This document contained a preamble, fourteen articles (consisting of both affirmations and denials), and comes with an initial list of over 150 signatories that reads like a... Read More about The Westminster Statement (or Why the Nashville Statement is Unnecessary)

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Read more about Review of “Biblical Doctrine” by John MacArthur and Richard Mayhue (Wheaton: Crossway, 2017)

John MacArthur and Richard Mayhue have put together a mostly solid lay-level systematic theology. While over 1,000 pages, the work is very approachable, making few assumptions about the theological education of the reader. As a lay-oriented work, the depth may not suit the needs of a seminarian, possibly even frustrating... Read More about Review of “Biblical Doctrine” by John MacArthur and Richard Mayhue (Wheaton: Crossway, 2017)

Comments: 0

Read more about Leviticus 15:16-24, Temple Prostitution, and the Regulative Principle

16 “If a man has an emission of semen, he shall bathe his whole body in water and be unclean until the evening. 17 And every garment and every skin on which the semen comes shall be washed with water and be unclean until the evening. 18 If a man lies with a woman and... Read More about Leviticus 15:16-24, Temple Prostitution, and the Regulative Principle

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Read more about Review of “Know Why You Believe” by K Scott Oliphint (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

In a culture where the Christian Worldview is constantly under attack, it is important to be able to give an answer for the hope that we have within us.. Sadly, many people that have grown up in broad evangelical churches have not been taught how to address even some of... Read More about Review of “Know Why You Believe” by K Scott Oliphint (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

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Read more about William Lane Craig – The Duplicitous Langage of Proposal (5.5)

Recently, Dr. Craig spoke on his podcast about his Christological Position. This was in response to an article forwarded to him from Richard Bushey titled Does William Lane Craig Have An Orthodox Christology? Some have asked me why this series has stalled out, wondering if I am done with my critique. I... Read More about William Lane Craig – The Duplicitous Langage of Proposal (5.5)

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Read more about Review of “Rediscovering the Holy Spirit” by Michael Horton (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

When I heard that Michael Horton was publishing a book-length treatment of Pneumatology, I did a little happy dance. This is a subject that is so often neglected, that it is to the shame and detriment of the Church. This book, however, is an absolute game changer. I say with... Read More about Review of “Rediscovering the Holy Spirit” by Michael Horton (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2017)

Comments: 0

Read more about William Lane Craig – Neo-Apollinarianism (5)

In the previous entries in this series, we have seen how Dr. Craig’s denial of realism (a position he calls anti-realism, rather than nominalism) has led him down the path of partialism (in which the three persons are not properly unified) and unitarianism (in which he implicitly treats the Trinity... Read More about William Lane Craig – Neo-Apollinarianism (5)

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Read more about Review of “Practicing the Power” by Sam Storms (Grand Raids: Zondervan, 2017)

Having come from a general evangelical background into Reformed thought, I had the same kind of hangover that most do. I was dispensational and charismatic… two things I was being told were unacceptable for a Reformed man. It was Sam Storms’ book Kingdom Come which helped me to see the... Read More about Review of “Practicing the Power” by Sam Storms (Grand Raids: Zondervan, 2017)

Comments: 0

Read more about William Lane Craig – Unitarianism (4)

Last time, we talked about how Dr. Craig’s position of anti-realism undermines the fundamental unity of the Godhead. It does this by functionally denying that such natures exist are a thing considered differently than persons. Where classic orthodox trinitarianism relies on the idea that natures, or ousiai, exist and that... Read More about William Lane Craig – Unitarianism (4)

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Read more about Review of “Evangelical, Sacramental, & Pentecostal” by Gordon Smith (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2017)

What are the true marks of the Church? The Reformers, broadly speaking, argued for three basic marks. The Gospel would be preached, the sacraments would be properly administered, and church discipline would be justly executed. In the recently published Evangelical, Sacramental, & Pentecostal, by Gordon Smith, we see an argument... Read More about Review of “Evangelical, Sacramental, & Pentecostal” by Gordon Smith (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2017)

Comments: 0

Read more about Review of “The Triune God” by Fred Sanders (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2016)

I was recently forwarded a copy of the newest entry in Zondervan’s New Studies in Dogmatics series. The Triune God by Fred Sanders is an important contribution to the study of Trinitarian theology that couldn’t have come at better time. Sanders lays out in the introduction to this volume, the... Read More about Review of “The Triune God” by Fred Sanders (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2016)

Comments: 0

Read more about William Lane Craig – Partialism (3)

In the last post, we discussed how Dr. Craig’s self-described anti-realism flows contrary to the metaphysical assumptions which undergird the Church’s historical articulation of the doctrines of the Trinity (Nicaea 325 and Constantinople 381) and the Hypostatic Union (Chalcedon 451). This leads him to argue that the Trinity itself is... Read More about William Lane Craig – Partialism (3)

Comments: 0

Read more about William Lane Craig – Anti-Realism (2)

As I mentioned in my introductory post, I have embarked on a project to assess and critique the Trinitarian and Christological theology of William Lane Craig. The errors, in my opinion, are grave enough to render him a teacher that Reformed Christians should not emulate, even in part. In today’s... Read More about William Lane Craig – Anti-Realism (2)

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Read more about William Lane Craig – Introduction (1)

Recently, I have noticed a flare-up of interest in philosopher and apologist William Lane Craig among young Reformed Christians in various circles I run in. I have been investigating Dr. Craig’s apologetics and theology on and off for close to seven years now. Because of what I have identified as... Read More about William Lane Craig – Introduction (1)

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Read more about Review of “A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament” edited by Michael Kruger (Wheaton: Crossway, 2016)

Today I will be reviewing the second installment of a two-part Biblical Theology collection published by Crossway. A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament is a collection of essays written by the past and present members of the faculty of Reformed Theological Seminary. It shares many traits in common with... Read More about Review of “A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament” edited by Michael Kruger (Wheaton: Crossway, 2016)

Comments: 0

Read more about Augustine and Divine Processions

This year, as part of my devotional studies, I am working my way through Augustine’s magisterial volume On the Trinity.[1] I am hoping to provide some reflection and analysis here as I work through it. Today, I was reading 2.1.4 and 2.1.5 today (99-100) and came upon something I think is a very fruitful discussion.... Read More about Augustine and Divine Processions

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Read more about Amazing Resource – Reformed Books Online

I wanted to share with my readers an amazing resource that I have known about for quite some time, but am just starting to dig into. The website Reformed Books Online is a website which has a collection of links to thousands of resources. Our purpose is to promote historic, reformed... Read More about Amazing Resource – Reformed Books Online

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Read more about The 3rd Commandment and Images of Christ

In the Reformed tradition, both English/Puritan[1] and Continental[2], the second commandment is understood as prohibiting all images of Christ regardless of their intended use. However, a common objection is made that this goes beyond the boundaries of Scriptural prohibition, which only excludes the use of images for the purpose of... Read More about The 3rd Commandment and Images of Christ

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Read more about Review of “Saving Calvinism” by Oliver Crisp (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016)

I recently received a copy of Oliver Crisp‘s new book, Saving Calvinism. The book is a work of analytic theology, with a dash of historical theology mixed in, and stands in continuity with his previous work Deviant Calvinism. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2014) The basic thesis of the book is that Calvinism —or... Read More about Review of “Saving Calvinism” by Oliver Crisp (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016)

Comments: 0

Read more about Tullian’s Current Membership Status

After my recent Open Letter to the South Florida Presbytery, and a Call to Repentance by many of Tullian‘s former confidants, I began to receive emails and messages asking what Tullian’s current status was. Did I know where he held membership? Was he going to be excommunicated? In order to... Read More about Tullian’s Current Membership Status

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Read more about A Response to a Call to Repentance

On Monday, several pastors and other prominent figures— who have been involved in events surrounding Tullian Tchividjian— issued a call to repentance. This statement has been received with —from what I can tell— three basic responses. Approval – There are those who see this and applaud it. They believe this... Read More about A Response to a Call to Repentance

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Read more about A Call to Repentance

The following letter was posted to the websites of Pastor Kevin Labby, Pastor Chris Rosebrough, Paul David Tripp, and Elyse Fitzpatrick. Let us all pray that this represents the beginning of what will ultimately be Tullian’s repentance. Dear Friends: We join with others in expressing our shared grief regarding these latest allegations,... Read More about A Call to Repentance

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Read more about Another Open Letter to the South Florida Presbytery

On September 1st, 2015, I issued an open letter to the Ruling Elders of the South Florida Presbytery. That letter was a strong call to action based on the activities of Tullian Tchividjian. A few days later I published something of a retraction as new information came to light. Well,... Read More about Another Open Letter to the South Florida Presbytery

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Read more about Tullian, Revelations, and Disgust

Recently, the Christian Post remarked on Tullian’s new marriage and return to preaching. The article, titled Tullian Tchividjian Emerges From Scandal With New Wife, Preaches Sermon on God’s Redemption, deserves a whole post to discuss it, and that will certainly happen, look for that in the week to come. However,... Read More about Tullian, Revelations, and Disgust

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Read more about Red and Yellow, Black and White, They are Precious…

Recently, I have begun listening to a variety of podcasts while at the office. I primarily work a desk job and this allows me to listen to while I check emails and take care of paperwork. One of the shows that I recommend is the Confessional Collective. This podcast has... Read More about Red and Yellow, Black and White, They are Precious…

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Read more about Review of “The Voices of the New Testament” by Derek Tidball (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016)

I was recently forwarded a new book published by InterVarsity Press. The Voices of the New Testament by Derek Tidball is an innovative new approach to Biblical Theology. In this book, Tidball sets up a panel discussion of sorts between the various New Testament authors. He then explores various themes by... Read More about Review of “The Voices of the New Testament” by Derek Tidball (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016)

Comments: 0

Read more about Advent Series – WCF Chapter 8: Of Christ the Mediator (1)

Every year during the season of Advent I do a four part series in to match up with the four Sunday’s of Advent. In 2014 we explored the various heresies which facilitated the controversies of the 4th and 5th centuries. In 2015 we took an in depth look at the... Read More about Advent Series – WCF Chapter 8: Of Christ the Mediator (1)

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Read more about SBLGNT, Robinson/Pierpont, and the Majority Text

One thing that I commonly hear repeated in discussions between Textus Receptus and Critical Text advocates is the idea that modern text critics always, or nearly always, favor the readings found in the oldest manuscripts as opposed to the readings found in the majority text. Now, it’s not an exact study,... Read More about SBLGNT, Robinson/Pierpont, and the Majority Text

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Read more about Looking to Jesus as our Example: A Word Study

“We are to be an example of Christ!” some exclaim. Sure,  Christians are to be following Christ’s example – no reasonable Christian would deny such a thing. Quite often, Jesus had compassion (and currently still does). However, what does compassion look like? What exactly is compassion? According to the Gospels,... Read More about Looking to Jesus as our Example: A Word Study

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Read more about An Interaction with “Closer to the Edge” by 30 Seconds to Mars

Content Warning: The music videos referenced and linked in this post may contain profanity. Music has always been a powerful influencer in mankind throughout human history. This fact has been recognized by people throughout the ages. Music has been used in almost every situation: times of happiness, times of sadness, times of... Read More about An Interaction with “Closer to the Edge” by 30 Seconds to Mars

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Read more about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (6)

Wrap Up I originally intended to provide an in depth analysis for the entire book, but having finished it there are a number of factors which lead me to forego doing so for the latter portion of the book. First, the remaining two chapters focusing on biblical studies are largely... Read More about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (6)

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Read more about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (4)

Having been disappointed thus far by the contributions by volume editor, Gerald McDermott, I eagerly moved forward to the first essay contributed by Craig Blaising. His presence among the writers was one of the factors which originally caused me to be suspicious of the repeated claim that what was being... Read More about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (4)

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Read more about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (3)

As we’ve seen in the Introduction and Chapter 1, this work make some very specific claims as to its aims. However, when scrutinized does not follow through on these claims. Chapter 2, unfortunately, is not any different. The thesis statement for Chapter , titled a History of Christian Zionism, is... Read More about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (3)

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Read more about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (2)

According to the introduction of this book, one of the main aims of the New Christian Zionism (as both a book and a movement) is to displace Supersessionism (26-27). Supersessionim is defined by McDermott as The view that the Christian church has superseded or replaced Israel as the locus of the... Read More about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” (2)

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Read more about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” edited by Gerald McDermott (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016) (1)

InterVarsity Press has been kind enough to send me a copy of a new collection of essays edited by Gerald McDermott. The New Christian Zionism: Fresh Perspectives on Israel is a handsome paperback that was released in July of 2016, and includes essays from a wide range of scholars. In its... Read More about Analysis of “The New Christian Zionism” edited by Gerald McDermott (Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2016) (1)

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Read more about Review of “A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the Old Testament” edited by Miles Van Pelt (Wheaton: Crossway, 2016)

Today, I will be offering a brief review of a valuable new entry into the discussion regarding Biblical-Theology. A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the Old Testament, edited by Miles Van Pelt, is the first of two volumes devoted to the topic. The second volume is a similar entry on the New Testament,... Read More about Review of “A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the Old Testament” edited by Miles Van Pelt (Wheaton: Crossway, 2016)

Comments: 0

Read more about Some Criticisms of Trevin Wax’s Christian Radio Article

This is a guest post by Austin Gravley. Austin is an intern at Redeemer Christian Church in Amarillo TX, and also works as a professional exterminator. He hopes to attend seminary once he finishes his B.A. in General Studies at WTAMU in Canyon, TX. You can follow him on Twitter at@gravley_austin Update:... Read More about Some Criticisms of Trevin Wax’s Christian Radio Article

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Read more about On Kings Kaleidoscope’s “A Prayer”

This is a guest post by Austin Gravley. Austin is an intern at Redeemer Christian Church in Amarillo TX, and also works as a professional exterminator. He hopes to attend seminary once he finishes his B.A. in General Studies at WTAMU in Canyon, TX. You can follow him on Twitter at @gravley_austin... Read More about On Kings Kaleidoscope’s “A Prayer”

Comments: 0

Read more about Review of “Augustine on the Christian Life” by Gerald Bray (Wheaton: Crossway, 2015)

Augustine on the Christian Life is an entry in the Theologians on the Christian Life series, published by Crossway. This entry, written by Gerald Bray, focuses on the 3rd and 4th-century bishop, Augustine of Hippo. The Theologians on the Christian Life series is a combination of biography and historical theology. Each entry... Read More about Review of “Augustine on the Christian Life” by Gerald Bray (Wheaton: Crossway, 2015)

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Read more about Common Grace… Objections? (4)

I have been asked to engage a brief, four-part series on the subject of Common Grace. This concept, which is present in every Christian tradition to lesser or greater degrees, is especially prominent in Reformed theology. This is the final in our four-part installment discussing Common Grace. I wanted to close by... Read More about Common Grace… Objections? (4)

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Read more about Review of Reformation Study Bible. New King James Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2016. (4)

I was recently blessed to receive a review copy of the much-anticipated revised Reformation Study Bible published by Reformation Trust. This is such a massive resource, that I’ve decided to dedicate several posts to reviewing it. Each post will be dedicated to reviewing a particular aspect of the tome (Book introductions,... Read More about Review of Reformation Study Bible. New King James Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2016. (4)

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Read more about Review of Reformation Study Bible. New King James Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2016. (3)

I was recently blessed to receive a review copy of the much-anticipated revised Reformation Study Bible published by Reformation Trust. This is such a massive resource, that I’ve decided to dedicate several posts to reviewing it. Each post will be dedicated to reviewing a particular aspect of the tome (Book introductions,... Read More about Review of Reformation Study Bible. New King James Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2016. (3)

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Read more about Common Grace in the Scriptures (1)

I have been asked to engage a brief, four-part series on the subject of Common Grace. This concept, which is present in every Christian tradition to lesser or greater degrees, is especially prominent in Reformed theology. To start, let’s explore the biblical passages that play into our topic. Genesis 3 and 9... Read More about Common Grace in the Scriptures (1)

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Read more about Ligonier Statement on Christology – Some Thoughts

Last year, Ligonier published the results of a study which showed that a concerning number of Americans don’t understand the essentials of the faith. I’m not sure that this was a surprise, but to see the numbers on paper was troubling. A large percentage of respondents answered in sub-Christian ways regarding essential... Read More about Ligonier Statement on Christology – Some Thoughts

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Read more about Mark Driscoll, Church Leadership, and Bad Hermeneutics

As my readers know, I have been openly critical of Mark Driscoll in the past. This started before Mars Hill imploded, but has found its focus on Mark’s behavior and return to ministry over the last year. Yesterday Mark announced that he will be starting a new congregation in Phoenix... Read More about Mark Driscoll, Church Leadership, and Bad Hermeneutics

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Read more about Review of “The Great Divide” by Jordan Cooper (Wipf & Stock, 2015)

Jordan Cooper is a former Reformed thinker, who converted to Lutheranism and now is a relatively well-known Pastor, Theologian, and Author. I was generously provided a review copy of The Great Divide by Wipf & Stock. Today I want to share some of my thoughts regarding this work. The primary thesis of... Read More about Review of “The Great Divide” by Jordan Cooper (Wipf & Stock, 2015)

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Read more about Clarified Chalcedonian Statement by Dr. RC Sproul

A few days ago I posted an in-depth explanation regarding some of my concerns with Dr. RC Sproul’s articulation of the Hypostatic Union. Highlighting some specific comments that appeared to be an essentially Nestorian perspective, I explained what I saw to be the problem. I also commented that I didn’t... Read More about Clarified Chalcedonian Statement by Dr. RC Sproul

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Read more about Review of Reformation Study Bible. English Standard Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2015. (2)

I was recently blessed to receive a review copy of the much-anticipated revised Reformation Study Bible published by Reformation Trust. This is such a massive resource, that I’ve decided to dedicate several posts to reviewing it. Each post will be dedicated to reviewing a particular aspect of the tome (Book introductions, maps/charts,... Read More about Review of Reformation Study Bible. English Standard Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2015. (2)

Comments: 0

Read more about Review of Reformation Study Bible. English Standard Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2015. (1)

I was recently blessed to receive a review copy of the much-anticipated revised Reformation Study Bible published by Reformation Trust. This is such a massive resource, that I’ve decided to dedicate several posts to reviewing it. Each post will be dedicated to reviewing a particular aspect of the tome (Book introductions,... Read More about Review of Reformation Study Bible. English Standard Version. Orlando: Reformation Trust, 2015. (1)